Tips to Write an Effective Nonprofit Business Plan

## Landmarks

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The purpose of a business plan is to help potential investors, lenders, and other interested parties understand your business and how you plan to grow it. It’s also a way for you to communicate your vision for the future of your company to the people who will help you achieve that vision. A well-written business plan can help you get the resources you need to start, grow, and sustain your business. It can also help you attract investors and lenders who want to invest in your business, and it can give you a competitive edge when you’re applying for grants and other types of funding. In this book, you’ll learn how to write an effective business plan. You’ll learn what to include in your plan, how to organize it, and how to put it together in a way that makes it easy to read and understand. You will also learn about the different types of business plans that are available, and you’ll find out how to choose the one that’s right for you. This book will give you the knowledge and confidence to write your own business plan, and if you do, you will be well on your way to achieving your business goals.

## Why Write a Nonprofit or Business Plan?

One of the most common questions I get asked is “Why should I write a business or nonprofit plan?” The short answer is that you should write a plan if you want to succeed. If you want your business to grow and prosper, you need a plan to guide you. You need to know where you’re going, what you’re doing to get there, and what you’ll do if things don’t work out the way you want them to. You can’t just start a business and expect it to be successful—you need to have a plan in place to make that happen. And if you’re a nonprofit organization, a plan is just as important to you as it is to a for-profit business. In fact, a nonprofit plan can be even more important, because it’s your mission to help people and make the world a better place. If your plan doesn’t help you accomplish that mission, you’re not going to be very effective at what you do. That’s why it’s so important to write a well-thought-out plan for your nonprofit or business.

Important Tips to Write SEO-Friendly Content for an eCommerce Website

If you’re looking to optimize your eCommerce website for search engines, there are a few things you need to keep in mind.

First of all, it’s important to make sure your content is SEO-friendly. This means that your content needs to be written in a way that search engines can read and understand. It also means that it needs to have the right keywords in it so that it can be found by the search engines. If you don’t know how to do this, we’ve got you covered!

In this article, we will go over some of the most important things you should be doing when writing content for your e-commerce website. We’ll also go over a few of the tools you can use to help you optimize your content and make it easier for the search engine spiders to read and index it.

Before we get started, make sure you have a good understanding of how search engines work. This will help you to write content that will help your website to rank higher in the search results. If this is something you are not familiar with, you can learn more about it.

1. Use the Right Keywords

One of the first things you want to do is make sure that the keywords you are using in your content are relevant to the product or service you are selling. If your keywords are not relevant to your products or services, you will not be able to rank well in search results and you will have a hard time getting people to visit your website.

You can use tools like the Google Keyword Planner to find out which keywords are the most popular and which ones are the least popular. You can use this information to determine which keywords to use in your website content.

Another thing you can do is to use the Google Adwords Keyword Tool. This tool will allow you to find keywords that are already being used by other websites. This can give you a good idea of what keywords people are using to search for the products and services you are offering.

Once you have found some keywords that you think will be good for your website, it is time to write your content. Make sure that you use these keywords in the title of your content, in the meta description, and in the body of the content itself. You want your content to be as keyword-rich as possible.

The more keywords you use, the more likely it is that your website will rank high in search engine results.

2. Use Proper Grammar and Punctuation

When you write content, you should use proper grammar and punctuation. This is important because it will make your content easier for people to read. It will also help search engines to understand what you are trying to say.

Make sure you use the right punctuation marks, like commas, periods, question marks, and exclamation points. You should also use proper capitalization.

3. Use Images and Videos

Images and videos are a great way to increase the amount of content you have on your website without having to write a lot of text. Images and videos can also help to make your website more visually appealing to people.

When it comes to using images and videos on your ecommerce website, you want your images to be high-resolution. You also want them to be optimized so that they will load quickly for your visitors.

4. Keep It Short and Simple

It is important to keep your content short and to the point. You do not want your visitors to have to scroll down your page to find the information they are looking for.

This is especially true if you are writing about a product or a service that is complicated or hard to understand. People will be less likely to buy from you if they have to read a long description of your product.

5. Use Headings and Sub-Headings

You should use headings and sub-headings to break up your content into different sections. This helps people to navigate through your content more easily.

For example, if you were writing a blog post, you could use the following headings:

– Introduction

– Body of the Post

– Conclusion

6. Make Sure Your Content is Easy to Read

Your content should be easy to read so that your visitors can find what they need quickly. If it is too hard to read, they will not want to read it and they will be more likely to click away from your website and never come back.

There are a number of tools that can help you with this. One of the best tools is the Readability Checker. This free tool will tell you how easy it is to read your content based on the Flesch-Kincaid Reading Ease score.

If your content has a score of less than 60, it will be very difficult for your readers to understand it. You will want to work on your content until it scores at least 60.

7. Use Keywords in the Title and Meta Description

Your title and meta description are very important because they are the first thing your visitors will see when they come to your site. If they do not like what they see, they are likely to leave your site and never return.

Your meta description should be a short description of what your page is about. It should be no more than 150 characters long. Your title should be between 60 and 80 characters long and should include your most important keywords.

The 30 Best Ways to Promote Your Business—With or Without Money

best ways to promote your business influencer collaboration

The 30 Best Ways to Promote Your Business—With or Without Money

Kristen McCormick

In order to survive and grow, your business needs customers. In order to get customers, you need to promote your business. In the good old days, this was a matter of deciding between a flyer, a brochure, a postcard, or an ad in the local newspaper.

map of digital marketing strategies for the best ways to promote your business

In this post, I’m going to cover the 30 most effective ways to promote your business, whether you have no budget, a limited budget, or some wiggle room. We’ll go over how to spread the word with respect to:

What is Marketing Strategy?

This term is widely used, especially in the digital market, but it doesn’t mean that it’s so widely disseminated that everyone really understands it as a whole. (There are several other terms in the online world that you can understand their meaning better with this digital entrepreneur’s glossary ).

Basically, marketing strategy is nothing more than planning all actions to promote your brand, product or service in advance and monitor the results of such actions to understand what should be maintained and what can be improved.

In addition, having a marketing strategy also means getting your product/service advertised to a potential customer in the best possible way. That means not trying to sell all the time and telling people what they should and shouldn’t do, but rather deliver value to people with what you provide and recommend solutions.

19. Distribute bumper stickers

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Flashmob at Sears Shop Your Way with Derek Hough jeanscene derekhough searsStyle YouTube

Book A Flash Mob For Hire Worldwide BookAFlashMob com

Sources:

https://www.wordstream.com/blog/ws/2020/11/02/promote-your-business
https://hotmart.com/en/blog/marketing-strategy-to-attract-customers
https://neilpatel.com/blog/startup-marketing-strategies/

Is It Time for a Rebranding? Here Are 7 Reasons It Might Be

brand identity toolkit

How to rebrand your business in 6 steps (Checklist)

Step #1: Audit your current brand

Step #2: Conduct market research

Step #3: Revisit your mission statement

Step #4: Revamp your visual identity

Step #5: Establish your brand voice and messaging

Step #6: Roll out your rebrand

  1. Audit your current brand. Determine what’s working, what isn’t, and where you have opportunities to grow and improve.
  2. Do some research on your current customers, new target audience, and competitors. The more you learn, the better your rebrand will be.
  3. Revisit your mission statement, a.k.a. your “why”. If you need to, re-establish your mission – it drives every part of your business, including your branding.
  4. Revamp your visual brand assets, like your logo, color scheme, and website.
  5. Set your brand voice and value proposition. Keep your messaging consistent across your marketing.
  6. Roll out your rebrand. Update all of your marketing materials with your new logo and messaging, then announce your rebrand to the world.

Rebranding your business involves rethinking your marketing strategy, visual identity, and messaging to create an updated version of your brand. A brand refresh can help you reach new audiences, change people’s perceptions of your brand, and revitalize your sales.

In this guide, we’ll walk through a six-step rebranding checklist. Whether your brand needs a partial refresh or a complete overhaul, you’ll learn how to rebrand your business without breaking the bank.

Step #1: Audit your current brand

Answering these questions will help you plan your rebranding efforts and avoid mistakes you made with your brand in the past. It will also provide you with opportunities and ideas for your rebrand.

Here’s why: The name “Uber” has strong brand recognition. People even use the business name as a verb (“I’m going to Uber to the airport”). A name change would have done Uber’s brand more harm than good.

For example, you might find that your brand messaging still fits your mission, but your logo design and website feel outdated. All you need is a visual brand refresh rather than completely changing every aspect of your brand.

Step #2: Conduct market research

Market research is critical for any big business or marketing decision. You might think you know what people think of your brand, or how it compares to competitors, but you can’t be sure until you do your research.

Surveys are one of our favorite customer research tools. They’re an easy and affordable way to collect valuable customer data and feedback. Plus, 90% of consumers have a more favorable view of businesses that ask them for feedback.

That’s where buyer personas come in. Content marketing consultant Amy Wright explains : “Buyer personas describe who your ideal customers are, what their days are like, the challenges they face, and how they make decisions.”

Finally, don’t forget to look at your competitors. Competitor research helps you figure out what your competitors do well and where there are opportunities for your brand to stand out. The more you learn about your competitors, the better equipped you’ll be.

As a creator or solopreneur, you are your brand. That’s especially true for business owners who run an education, coaching , or lifestyle business. Your personality, experience, and unique outlook differentiate you from the competition.

Step #3: Revisit your mission statement

In other words, it’s the “why” behind your business. What motivates you to get up each morning and do this work? Your mission should drive every part of your brand, from your logo to your brand voice.

Your “why” might be the same as when you first launched your brand, and that’s okay. Use this step as an opportunity to remind yourself of your mission and make sure that you stay true to it across your branding.

First, when you put your mission front and center, it’ll resonate with your target audience. 89% of customers are loyal to brands who share their values, and 56% of customers feel more loyal to brands that “get them”.

7 Signs It’s Time for a Rebranding

There are certainly reasons to consider rebranding, as we’ll cover below. However, while these may be applicable, no decision should be made without doing significant research, having serious discussions with leadership, and crafting a strong execution plan. (No one has time, money, and energy to waste on a sloppy execution—and, we promise, the Internet will not be kind to your final results if you do it haphazardly.)

1) You look like everybody else in your industry.

Industries change and evolve, and savvy brands do their best to keep up. However, sometimes brands start to think in hivemind and subconsciously adopt each other’s traits. There’s no differentiation, no originality, no standing out. (For example, Netflix and YouTube are both streaming-video services that use a red, white, and black palette. When Twitch launched with an in-your-face purple palette, it made a strong visual statement to differentiate.)

Another reason brands can start to look like alike is because they try to one-up each other through rebrands. Just because a competitor changed a logo doesn’t mean you have to. When a rebrand is reactionary, it rarely feels authentic, unique, and original.

Example: The Parkinson’s Foundation brand identity could have been mistaken for pretty much any nonprofit organization cause, from “saving the ocean” to “mentoring underprivileged kids.” But a 2018 rebrand by Ultravirgo helped bring focus, life, and a cohesive feel that reflects the organization’s unique mission.

BEFORE

Ultravirgo example

Ultravirgo rebrand example 2

2) You’re going after a new audience.

Sometimes your company is looking to attract a new group of people, but your branding is not primed to help you connect with them. (Unsurprisingly, many brands have struggled to attract millennials, whose media consumption habits and values differ from other generations.)

Your brand should always speak to the people you’re trying to reach, so in this case, a rebrand may be the right choice. However, you don’t want to do anything that would alienate your existing customer base (again, think of the Gap reaction). Ideally, your rebrand would be something that enhances your brand identity in a way that appeals to both existing and new customers.

Diet coke example

3) Your brand has expanded.

With any success comes the urge to expand—regardless of industry. However, many brands have identities that don’t reflect their current brand strategy or offerings. They may be constrained by cumbersome logos that don’t adapt well for the web or by names that are too product-specific.

Example: Over the last 87 years, Ad Age has evolved from a one-sheet to a multi-platform media brand. Its 2017 rebrand by OCD gave the brand a bolder, more colorful identity, suitable for web, print, and any other media.

ad age rebrand

4) Your brand is painfully outdated.

This is probably the number one reason brands want to rebrand. If t he look and feel of your brand is stale and y ou’re embarrassed to go on your website, a rebrand might be in the cards.

This is a common problem for industries that evolve quickly. (FYI, Google has had seven logos over the last 20 years.) The instinct to rebrand is understandable; however, there is a difference between an old logo and an outdated logo. If you have a well-established brand, it’s best to do solid audience research before tossing the old one out. Again, the infamous Gap logo disaster saw a backlash because the brand tried to “modernize,” when consumers felt far more connected to the iconic logo.

Example: Sometimes modernization is simply a subtle tweak. In 2016 Pentagram designed a new logo for Mastercard, creating a modern feel while retaining the iconic overlapping circles. It was a simple way to bring their ‘90s-inspired design into the future.

mastercard rebrand

5) It doesn’t reflect your values.

As you surely know, people (especially millennials) want to align themselves with brands whose values they share. If you’ve crafted a strong brand strategy and articulated your Brand Heart (your purpose, vision, mission, and values), you should know what your core principles are.

I’m Thinking About Rebranding. Where Do I Start?

Hopefully, if you spend at least as much time on your business as you spend in your business, you have a good sense of where your company stands with its customers, and you solicit feedback about your brand regularly.

Begin With an Annual Brand Assessment.

The Brand Leader offers a comprehensive Brand Assessment to help companies stay in-touch with their brand, their customers, and their industry. We recommend that our clients complete the brand assessment annually to check the health of their business, just like you would get an annual check-up for physical health.

Identify What’s No Longer Working.

If, after conducting the Brand Assessment, you think your brand no longer matches your company, the next step is to determine what isn’t working. Not all rebrands are created equal. You may find that you need to:

  • Refresh. It could be that your messaging is solid but your look is outdated or amateurish. Maybe all you need is a quick facelift: better colors, a new typography treatment, a stronger logo, etc.
  • Reposition. You may also find that your look is working for you, but your messaging isn’t targeting the right customers—or properly understanding why they became your customers in the first place. In situations like these, it makes sense to invest in repositioning your brand in order to better reach your best customers.
  • Rebrand. You may also find that nothing is quite working for your brand anymore, and you need to consider a complete overhaul of your brand: name, image, messaging, corporate culture, etc. Don’t worry. We’ve been there before and know how to help you through the rebranding process.

Map Out Where You Want to Go.

As we mentioned before, a good brand is a stake in the ground. When you update the look, feel, and messaging of your brand, you are telling customers what they can expect from you going forward. So you have to be sure that what you’re telling customers really represents who you are now and where you want to go.

Solicit Additional Feedback.

As you rebrand, be sure to solicit additional feedback at every step—and not only from your marketing agency. Talk to the key stakeholders in your company (you know, the people who will have to live with your new look and new name every day) as well as your best customers. Ask them if the rebrand gets to the core of what you do and who you are. If not, keep working.

Sources:

https://www.podia.com/articles/rebranding-your-business
https://www.columnfivemedia.com/how-to-know-if-you-should-rebrand/
https://thebrandleader.com/how-often-should-my-company-rebrand/
Is It Time for a Rebranding? Here Are 7 Reasons It Might Be

ACLU original branding

7 Signs It’s Time for a Rebranding

There are certainly reasons to consider rebranding, as we’ll cover below. However, while these may be applicable, no decision should be made without doing significant research, having serious discussions with leadership, and crafting a strong execution plan. (No one has time, money, and energy to waste on a sloppy execution—and, we promise, the Internet will not be kind to your final results if you do it haphazardly.)

1) You look like everybody else in your industry.

Industries change and evolve, and savvy brands do their best to keep up. However, sometimes brands start to think in hivemind and subconsciously adopt each other’s traits. There’s no differentiation, no originality, no standing out. (For example, Netflix and YouTube are both streaming-video services that use a red, white, and black palette. When Twitch launched with an in-your-face purple palette, it made a strong visual statement to differentiate.)

Another reason brands can start to look like alike is because they try to one-up each other through rebrands. Just because a competitor changed a logo doesn’t mean you have to. When a rebrand is reactionary, it rarely feels authentic, unique, and original.

Example: The Parkinson’s Foundation brand identity could have been mistaken for pretty much any nonprofit organization cause, from “saving the ocean” to “mentoring underprivileged kids.” But a 2018 rebrand by Ultravirgo helped bring focus, life, and a cohesive feel that reflects the organization’s unique mission.

BEFORE

Ultravirgo example

Ultravirgo rebrand example 2

2) You’re going after a new audience.

Sometimes your company is looking to attract a new group of people, but your branding is not primed to help you connect with them. (Unsurprisingly, many brands have struggled to attract millennials, whose media consumption habits and values differ from other generations.)

Your brand should always speak to the people you’re trying to reach, so in this case, a rebrand may be the right choice. However, you don’t want to do anything that would alienate your existing customer base (again, think of the Gap reaction). Ideally, your rebrand would be something that enhances your brand identity in a way that appeals to both existing and new customers.

Diet coke example

3) Your brand has expanded.

With any success comes the urge to expand—regardless of industry. However, many brands have identities that don’t reflect their current brand strategy or offerings. They may be constrained by cumbersome logos that don’t adapt well for the web or by names that are too product-specific.

Example: Over the last 87 years, Ad Age has evolved from a one-sheet to a multi-platform media brand. Its 2017 rebrand by OCD gave the brand a bolder, more colorful identity, suitable for web, print, and any other media.

ad age rebrand

4) Your brand is painfully outdated.

This is probably the number one reason brands want to rebrand. If t he look and feel of your brand is stale and y ou’re embarrassed to go on your website, a rebrand might be in the cards.

This is a common problem for industries that evolve quickly. (FYI, Google has had seven logos over the last 20 years.) The instinct to rebrand is understandable; however, there is a difference between an old logo and an outdated logo. If you have a well-established brand, it’s best to do solid audience research before tossing the old one out. Again, the infamous Gap logo disaster saw a backlash because the brand tried to “modernize,” when consumers felt far more connected to the iconic logo.

Example: Sometimes modernization is simply a subtle tweak. In 2016 Pentagram designed a new logo for Mastercard, creating a modern feel while retaining the iconic overlapping circles. It was a simple way to bring their ‘90s-inspired design into the future.

mastercard rebrand

5) It doesn’t reflect your values.

As you surely know, people (especially millennials) want to align themselves with brands whose values they share. If you’ve crafted a strong brand strategy and articulated your Brand Heart (your purpose, vision, mission, and values), you should know what your core principles are.

5 Reasons to Consider Rebranding Your Company

Rebranding is a powerful move, and the decision to undergo a brand overhaul can be risky if it’s not done well. A great rebrand, such as the new look Harley-Davidson unveiled in 2013 can bring a company back from the brink of bankruptcy. A poor rebrand, on the other hand, can have equally disastrous results, such as the package redesign that lost Tropicana 20% in sales or the costly Gap overhaul that the company abandoned less than a month later due to customer outcry.

Since so much is at stake, it’s important to know why you plan to overhaul your brand before you begin. Here are 5 common reasons that companies often cite for initiating a rebranding campaign :

  1. “We have an Image Problem.” Image problems are not the main reason that companies decide to rebrand—but let’s go ahead and get the negative reason that most people associate with a rebrand out of the way first. Image problems can include everything from an outdated look and feel that needs a refresh to a full-scale reputation management campaign and name change. Either way, a rebrand can save a company from losing relevance in the marketplace and be a good course correction, for both the company operations and the customer. It’s important to note, however, that the new brand must be authentic; that is, the investment will be short-lived it it’s simply “throwing lipstick on the old pig” as the old metaphor goes. All the great branding in the world can’t overcome real operational, product, and service problems. In fact, rebrand without fixing major problems at your own peril; putting a fresh new set of promises out that you know, fundamentally, you can’t deliver on has been the nail in the coffin for many companies unwilling to face their real issues, instead hoping a rebrand will cover up the underlying challenges.
  2. “Our Company Has Evolved and We Have a New Story to Tell.” Again, every company evolves, and they evolve in unique ways. Maybe you’ve expanded, adding new markets, and your brand needs to reflect the fact that you operate in multiple regions or countries now. Maybe you started out in a general field and you’ve become more specialized, so you need a brand that reflects your niche market. Maybe you used to do A, and now you do A & B, so you need to align your messaging to match your product or service offerings. Or, maybe you want to expand into a new market, in which case a rebrand, or the creation of a sub-brand with a connection to the flagship brand (or not, in some cases, for specific reasons), can serve as a stake in the ground. A map to help you get where you want to be. However your company has evolved, recognize it will continue to evolve long after you rebrand. It’s important to remember that a great brand is both authentic and aspirational—helping customers know what to expect, and then meeting (and occasionally exceeding) those expectations. It’s wonderful to be able to surprise & delight your customers once in awhile.
  3. “Our Market is Shifting.” Perhaps your company hasn’t evolved, but it needs to. Many industries, particularly in tech, are shifting constantly, and the rate at which people are receiving messages and communication from the brands they love is increasing exponentially. Consumer behavior is always changing, and companies that don’t adjust can lag behind and find it difficult to catch up. You don’t have to look too far to find companies that remained the same while the market shifted underneath them—and they missed the wave and suffered devastating consequences. Blockbuster, MySpace, Napster, Kodak, and GM, to name a few. A great rebrand can not only change how your customers see you, but also how you see yourself and what you do. Companies that are able to see the shift coming and adjust their brand preemptively are the ones that thrive.
  4. “We’re Not Attracting the Right Customers (Or the Right Talent.)” If you find that the customers you’re attracting are not the customers you want, or that you’re lagging behind when it comes to attracting and retaining the best talent, it could be time for a rebrand. Today more than ever, both customers and employees want to identify with a brand on multiple levels—and share values, social concerns, and outlook. A great brand will let both audiences know, immediately, who and what they’re dealing with. The word customer, in fact, is a very misunderstood word; typically its use is limiting. Consider, as you weigh the pros and cons of rebranding and evaluate where you might have branding issues, who your customers are. By definition, a customer is someone who receives some sort of value, either through a single exchange, or a series of exchanges over time. That exchange is typically them giving away money, time or talent to you, in exchange for value—a product, a service, a paycheck, a promise for a better tomorrow. Therefore, you’ll be much more heavily armed and able to answer the “should we rebrand” question if you shift to “where do we have brand challenges, which relationship segments have we not adequately positioned our story to maximize ROI?” Consider your markets as every prospect, every current external customer, every vendor relationship, every employee, every partner in your partner channel, the media, and others. Remember, a brand is a series of promises. Thinking through each of these segments and more will help you determine where there’s been a trail of broken promises. You can also better see where there’s a disconnect in what you’re promising in the first place, where you’ve underinvested, under or over-promised, where you’ve maximized ROI, and where you’ve been leaving some ROI on the table.
  5. “We’re About to Have a Significant Change in Leadership.” Mergers and acquisitions, or simply a change in management, often include a change in operations or business philosophy that necessitates rebranding. In these cases, the brand overhaul will typically include changes to employee training and business practices in addition to a new name and new look.

Your Idea of the Business has Changed

Maybe you learned things about the industry you never would have imagined. Maybe you’ve come up with new product ideas that don’t exactly fit with your original business plan and branding strategy.

Success in business means being flexible and adaptable. It is about knowing when things are working and when they are not. If you know that your business is not working in its current form, it is time to shake things up. Rebranding can help you to completely transform your business and take it in another direction.

These situations provide an opportunity where rebranding your business could be the next step to growth and long term success, and taking advantage of this opportunity could prove highly beneficial in the long term.

Sources:

https://www.columnfivemedia.com/how-to-know-if-you-should-rebrand/
https://thebrandleader.com/how-often-should-my-company-rebrand/
https://justcreative.com/10-signs-its-time-to-rebrand-your-business/

How to Negotiate a Higher Salary After a New Job Offer (With Scripts)

The Professional’s Guide to Negotiating a Job Offer

LearnHowToBecome.org is an advertising-supported site. Featured or trusted partner programs and all school search, finder, or match results are for schools that compensate us. This compensation does not influence our school rankings, resource guides, or other editorially-independent information published on this site.

Many job hunters mistakenly believe that when they’re hired for a job, they must accept what’s being offered to them in terms of salary and benefits. However, this isn’t necessarily the case. In fact, in many cases, workers can successfully negotiate better terms for a job offer so they don’t end up leaving money on the table. But this is only possible if they ask a potential employer for what they want.

“You get what you negotiate. Your career is your responsibility. Very few things in this world are certain. That includes your career. If there is something important to you, don’t presume that anyone can read your mind or will fight for you,” says career coach Carlota Zee. This guide is designed to increase the chances of job-seekers getting what they want from an offer. Continue reading for negotiation strategies, as well as information on what parts of a job offer can be negotiated and how to create an effective counter offer.

Finding the Average Salary and Compensation Package for Your Position

1. Salary Databases and Other Online Sources

Websites like PayScale and Glassdoor have salary estimates for just about any position. Some of these sites allow users to filter the information based on location. You can also go to the Bureau of Labor Statistics, which provides a comprehensive database of salary information for different jobs.

Other Salary Comparison Websites

2. Dig Deep to Learn All About the Company

Find out if the company has job grades or bands, and what band your target position is in. If they have a job grade system, you have to accept that it’s almost impossible to go above their imposed upper limit.

The salary also differs based on the company’s size and industry. A mom and pop shop will have a smaller budget compared to a multinational conglomerate, and it’s the same case if you compare a Wall Street firm with a local restaurant.

3. Ask Other Employees in Similar Positions

Ask your friends, family, professors, former colleagues, and mentors to give you feedback on the job offer you got. Ask them if it’s fair based on what they receive. People are, in general, uncomfortable talking about their income, but you’ll be surprised how open some friends are.

4. Gather Salary Info From Unions

5. Compare Cost of Living of Your Location

Compensation is also affected by the job’s location due to cost of living and talent demand. Big cities like New York and Silicon Valley have higher compensation, as opposed to small rural towns.

The Importance of Choosing the Right Time to Negotiate

Anna Runyan, Founder of Classy Career Girl, explains, “You don’t want to send a signal that you only care how much you can get. So always wait for the employer to make an offer, and never be the one to start the discussion about salary.”

This is a basic rule of negotiation, you have more power when the company has narrowed down their prospects to just one candidate—you. Sure, they probably have a second choice, but they prefer you more than the second pick, and a lot more than the other candidates. That’s leverage you can use.

When It’s Too Late to Negotiate

You can’t take your word back after you agreed to the job offer. Even if you realize the commuting expenses are terrible, and the money isn’t enough to pay your loans, your chances of winning that negotiation are slim to none.

The employer, the HR manager, and all your co-workers will think you’re either not serious about the job, or a total diva. Either reputation isn’t appealing when you’re starting out with a new company.

Email Templates to Lean on

Making a counter offer

  1. Express your continued excitement regarding the company and the role
  2. Discuss why you are the best candidate for the position — this is the time to bring in those value-enhancing qualities you found earlier.
  3. Include a statement of the total compensation package you were offered.
  4. Detail your full counter offer, including numbers and the reasons behind them– this is a time to bring in value-enhancing qualities and other research you did on the typical position salary.
  5. Re-emphasize your interest and appreciation for their consideration, as well as any key points you’d like them to reflect on.
  6. Express your willingness to discuss the counter offer further. Meeting in person is likely the best way to accomplish this.

Hello (Recruiter Name),

I would like to express my excitement and personally thank you for offering me the Project Manager position at XYZ Company. I greatly appreciate the opportunity to work for such a fast growing, forward-thinking company whose values align so well with my own. With my above average leadership experience and quality management skills, I’m confident that I will make strong contributions to your organization.

I found the equity and signing bonus to be agreeable, and would like to thank you for making them so generous. However, I would like to discuss refining the base salary. The salary of $57,000 that you offered is a bit less than what I was hoping for. The industry average falls at $65,000 and I would like to propose raising my base salary to match that. I believe that amount better reflects the experience and skill set I would bring to this position.

XYZ is a fantastic company and I look forward to joining the team! I appreciate you taking the time to consider my proposal and hope that we can come to an agreement. I would love to continue the discussion whenever you’re ready. You can reach me at this email address or at 123-456-7890 and I’d be happy to arrange a meeting.

I look forward to hearing from you soon!

Kind regards,

(Your Name)

Expressing disappointment outright

Hi (Recruiter Name),

I would like to express my excitement and personally thank you for offering me the Project Manager position at XYZ Company. I greatly appreciate the opportunity to work for such a fast growing, forward-thinking company whose values align so well with my own. With my above average leadership experience and quality management skills, I’m confident that I would make strong contributions to your organization.

I found the equity and signing bonus to be agreeable, and would like to thank you for making them so generous. However, I found the base salary to be somewhat disappointing. Based on my research, it is a bit lower than similar positions at this level. Are there any changes that can be made to the salary? If so, I would like to take them into account before making my final decision.

Thank you for your consideration and I look forward to hearing from you soon!

Kind regards,

(Your Name)

The information provided herein is for general informational purposes only and is not intended to provide tax, legal, or investment advice and should not be construed as an offer to sell, a solicitation of an offer to buy, or a recommendation of any security by Candor, its employees and affiliates, or any third-party. Any expressions of opinion or assumptions are for illustrative purposes only and are subject to change without notice. Past performance is not a guarantee of future results and the opinions presented herein should not be viewed as an indicator of future performance. Investing in securities involves risk. Loss of principal is possible.

Third-party data has been obtained from sources we believe to be reliable; however, its accuracy, completeness, or reliability cannot be guaranteed. Candor does not receive compensation to promote or discuss any particular Company; however, Candor, its employees and affiliates, and/or its clients may hold positions in securities of the Companies discussed.

Resource:

https://www.learnhowtobecome.org/career-resource-center/negotiate-job-offer/
https://business.tutsplus.com/tutorials/negotiate-higher-salary-for-new-job–cms-29243
https://candor.co/articles/salary-negotiation/should-you-negotiate-a-lowball-job-offer-templates-and-tips

How to Negotiate Salary after you get a Job Offer (with Examples)

How to Successfully Negotiate Salary at Amazon

How To Negotiate Salary in an Email (With Samples)

Negotiating a salary through email is an important skill that could help you earn adequate compensation for your experience, education and skills. Whether you’re responding to an initial job offer or asking for a raise, it’s important to understand the salary negotiation process. Learning more about salary negotiation emails and reviewing samples could help you negotiate your salary effectively. In this article, we explain what a salary negotiation email is, discuss why they’re important, show how to negotiate salary in an email and provide tips and samples for you to reference.

A salary negotiation email is a document you can send to employers or hiring managers to discuss payment options. Occasionally, you may negotiate a salary in an in-person meeting or interview, but it’s common to do this over email in many industries. You may send a salary negotiation email after receiving a job offer for a new role or while you’re working for a company and want to request a raise. In a salary negotiation email, an employee or prospective employee proposes a new salary amount and their reasoning.

The employer can then read the email and may respond with a counteroffer to reach a compromise. For example, if you receive a job offer and the hiring manager offers you a salary of $40,000 per year, and you think, based on your experience and training, your salary can be closer to $50,000, you might negotiate this in an email before signing the job offer. The hiring manager might accept your proposed salary, or they may suggest a counteroffer. For instance, they might offer $45,000 as a compromise.

Why is it important to write a salary negotiation email?

It’s important to write a salary negotiation email when you feel your qualifications and experiences deserve a higher rate of pay. Ideally, a job offer matches your salary expectations, but occasionally it might be lower than you anticipate or desire. This may occur after receiving an initial job offer. It can also occur when you’re excelling in a role and think it’s time for a raise.

The offer is lower than anticipated. If you’re moving into a new role and you have the necessary skills and experience and the company offers a lower salary, you may consider negotiating a higher rate.

You’re successful in your role. If you’re been in your role for a while and are succeeding or completing additional tasks, you may consider writing a negotiation email requesting a higher salary. You may also choose to negotiate a raise in person.

The standard of living has changed. Over time, the standard of living costs, such as housing, transportation and food, can rise. If this occurs and your salary has remained constant, you may consider negotiating a raise in an email.

Negotiating a new salary can help you find the right role for your career and personal goals. Writing a negotiation email can give you time to craft a professional and thoughtful request, which may help you earn a higher salary.

Showing just cause – the practical approach

For this approach to work, add up the value of the entire package, not just the annual wage. For example, are stock options, health insurance, use of a company gym or a generous retirement contribution compensating you for a lower salary than you would prefer?

For instance, will it lead to considerable relocation costs and a higher standard of living rate in your new destination? Will there be considerable commuting costs not covered by the package as it stands?

“Though the salary in your job offer is above the one I currently earn, my new role will involve more hours and more travel. I am hoping you will agree to increase the salary offer, to compensate for the high investment of time I intend to contribute to supporting your business development.”

The best factual argument for increasing a job offer salary though is if the level is below the accepted norm for that role! Do some research and politely point out salary averages for the post, and the minimum you feel is appropriate.

Negotiate salary meeting 1 on 1

The value of your experience and expertise

It’s not just your time that you need your new employer to recognise and reward. Know your professional worth – especially if the post is a hard-to-fill one, in technical or skill areas that are highly in demand.

If you feel the job offer doesn’t fully match your level of skill and career progression, you are well within your rights to say so. This is an especially strong negotiation standpoint if the vacancy was advertised with a sliding salary scale, and you didn’t get offered the upper limit.

You could even use this as an opportunity to point out attributes and experiences that may not have been fully communicated in your interview. It also involves showing confidence in your value to the organisation, without appearing boastful. (Or inflating your abilities beyond what you can deliver!)

“My management/technical abilities were greatly enhanced during projects I didn’t get a chance to outline in my interview. Therefore, there are professional capabilities that may not have been taken into account when setting this salary offer.”

“I would be pleased to discuss this further, but my experience and expertise warrant a higher remuneration, which will be apparent as soon as I start work for you. So, I am requesting a starting salary of. “

Negotiate Salary at Amazon

Salary negotiating at Amazon is different from other big tech companies, mainly the other members of the FAANG ( Facebook, Apple, Amazon, Netflix, Google), due to the unique structure of their compensation packages, which are designed primarily to attract and retain talent for a long time. Amazon likes to offer creative options to modify their salary benefits instead of concentrating purely on hard sums. This is why it is important to note that employees who are more flexible about their payment options will negotiate their salaries more successfully. Plus, since Amazon likes to retain talent for a long time, their salary structures get better with the number of years an employee has worked for them, especially after the second year. At first glance, things can seem quite complicated for the uninitiated. But there is no reason to worry. We will first understand Amazon’s salary structure and then go into tips on properly navigating through them to get the deal that suits you the best. Let’s dive right in.

How to Successfully Negotiate Salary at Amazon

This is the stable and predictable component of the salary offer. Amazon is the only big tech company with a strict base salary cap in place, depending on geographic location. The base salary cap in Seattle will be different from the base salary cap in San Francisco. Everybody is subject to this base salary cap, even the CEO himself, which Amazon likes to remind its employees of frequently. If an offer runs into the base salary cap, it is better to negotiate the bonuses and equity. Senior roles often get large equity grants and sign-on bonuses with modest base salaries. Base salary can be improved up to a point, but an employee should not expect any significant changes at once.

Unlike other big tech companies, the performance bonuses offered at Amazon are highly unpredictable. After much pressure, recruiters will eventually disclose that only a small percentage of high-performing employees receive a performance bonus. Most offer letters from Amazon don’t even include a section outlining the target performance bonus. Therefore, it is essential to have the performance bonus offered by other companies if those companies offer performance bonuses while comparing offers from them with that of Amazon. Simply comparing base salaries, signing bonuses, and equity value might end up giving an illusion of a better deal where there isn’t one.

Just like performance bonuses, stock refreshers are also offered rarely at Amazon. Like all companies, they are dependent upon the performance reviews of each employee. While they exist at Amazon, one would be hard-pressed to find an employee who gets some, especially at the junior levels. Furthermore, they are also at usually lower dollar values compared to other big tech companies. It is essential to consider these before comparing compensation packages offered by Amazon and any other tech giant.

  • Before the Job Offer
    • The recruiter from Amazon will ask for your current salary or your salary history. Never tell them your salary history. This is illegal in some states, so you will be well within your rights to not say so. If not, then politely decline, saying that you are not comfortable with sharing your salary details.
    • They will also ask about what your expectations are regarding a compensation package. Again, never tell them what you expect. You will be guessing numbers that might sound good to you, while they will know what a proper number is for a person with your skillset. Also, with Amazon’s equity distribution schedule being so complex, it is difficult to come up with any actual number per se. Throwing in an arbitrary number may result in you losing out the money in the future. You are much better off with letting them give you a number and then negotiating from there. When you are asked this question, say something about not having thought of salary yet and just focusing on the job. Add that you are sure that you can reach a number that’s best for everyone, to be polite.

    • The first thing to do is to see whether the base salary you are offered is anywhere near the base cap. For this, you have to be aware of what the base cap is in your area. After that, you will have a clear idea if you can negotiate on the base salary or if it would be better to talk about your signing bonus and equity shares. It is important to improve the signing bonus for the Year 1 and Year 2 gaps while waiting for the bulk of the equity in Year 3 and Year 4 if you receive more equity.
    • Amazon likes to move fast with its recruitment process. This can be both a boon and a curse. This will result in more deadline pressure for employees, especially at the junior level, to come up with their salary expectations. However, it is best to deflect and let them make an offer first. Then you can take time to digest that offer and come up with a counteroffer in time. You can buy yourself more time by breaking up the process into separate calls. Furthermore, if you have an offer from Amazon, you should always let other companies you are negotiating with know this. This will put pressure on them to speed up their selection process for you as well.
    • Since Amazon offers very poor benefits such as vacation (two weeks only), ask about job benefits and compare them with other companies if you have a competing offer. While it is almost impossible to negotiate company benefits into your contract, this can, however, be used as leverage to increase your annual compensation.
    • Ask specifically for annual compensation value to avoid scenarios where your annual compensation might be going down in Year 3 and Year 4. Tell the recruiter that you target a specific amount yearly. This will help you compare compensation packages between Amazon and other companies if you have another offer.

    Resource:

    https://sg.indeed.com/career-advice/pay-salary/how-to-negotiate-salary-in-email
    https://virtualspeech.com/blog/negotiate-salary-job-offer
    https://howigotjob.com/career-advice/how-to-successfully-negotiate-salary-at-amazon/

How to Decline a Job Offer

Main

Why decline a job offer?

You might decline a job offer for various reasons, including an unfavourable salary, benefits or company culture. If you have been applying for multiple positions, you may also have gotten an offer from another organization. If you feel like a position isn’t the right fit for you, it’s appropriate to let the hiring manager know as soon as possible so they can hire another candidate.

If you need to decline a job offer, you can take certain steps to be courteous and professional. It’s helpful to maintain a connection with the employer in the event that you want to work for them in the future.

1. Be timely

One of the most important things to do when declining a job offer is to do so promptly. The employer likely has a backup option should you say no, and allowing them time to reach out to other candidates is beneficial for both parties. If the employer gives you a time frame for when they expect an answer, be sure to decline the job offer well within that window.

Providing an answer on time not only shows how serious you are, but also portrays you as a professional. This can be beneficial if the employer has another open position in the future that you want to apply for.

2. Choose your communication method wisely

How you communicate with the hiring manager is important. When declining a job offer, it’s best to relay the information over the phone, if possible. This way, the hiring manager can hear your sincerity and genuine appreciation that they took time out of their schedule to meet with you. In some cases, you might need to call the HR manager instead of the interviewer. If this is the case, always make sure to send an email to the hiring manager as well, thanking them for their time.

If you are not able to reach the hiring manager over the phone to decline the job offer, leave a voicemail. Once you have done this, follow up with an email, as this will ensure they receive your message promptly on whatever mode of communication they prefer. You can be direct in your voicemail and go into more detail through the email as to why you are not accepting the role.

I have left you a voicemail but wanted to follow up via email to ensure you received my answer on time. I want to thank you for taking the time out of your day to interview me. I very much appreciated being shown around the office and meeting members of the team.

Unfortunately, I’m going to have to decline the job offer at this time. It is a difficult decision to make, but as mentioned in my interview, the salary I’m looking for is slightly higher than what you are offering. I hope that you keep me in mind for future positions that are more in line with what I’m looking for.

During the interview, feel free to ask the hiring manager what their preferred communication method is. Sometimes if the person is busy, they will ask you to email instead of call.

3. Provide a reason

You should provide a brief, but honest, reason for declining a job offer. Many companies look for constructive feedback when a candidate declines their job offer, so providing a valid reason for not accepting the offer can help them improve their hiring methods or their business practices.

It also allows the company to counter offer. If it is something simple like the salary is too low, perhaps they will reconsider and offer you more money. They could also offer additional benefits like more vacation time, work from home days or a better benefits package. The following are some examples of ways to decline a job offer politely:

“I have given it much thought, but work-life balance is crucial to me, and I’m looking for a role that will provide me with the amount of time off I need to recharge and be a better employee.”

4. Be appreciative

The hiring process involves several stages, so it can take a long time for an employer to find the right candidate. There are dozens of resumes to read through, social media accounts to research, interviews to conduct and contracts to draft and negotiate.

If you are declining a job offer, be sure to thank the human resources or hiring manager for their time. They likely put in many hours getting to the point of offering you a position, and having you reject the offer means they may have to start part or all of the process again.

“Thank you so much for taking the time to meet with me and answer all of the questions I had about the customer service representative role. I learned a lot about your company and how the team functions together, which was incredibly helpful in understanding the full scope of the position.”

“I wanted to thank you again for spending time to meet with me last week for the marketing specialist role. It was fascinating getting to see your office space and meeting some members of the team.”

5. Leave open the possibility of other opportunities

As you progress in your career, you might encounter the same professionals in your field. This is especially true if you work in the same city your whole career. Therefore, you always want to leave the interview on a positive note since you may find yourself interviewing with the same hiring manager again in the future.

Do a Final Gut Check

Before you give your final answer, it’s worth taking a final moment to make absolutely certain that you’re not interested in the job. After all, there’s no going back once you turn down a job offer. The moment an employer hears “no,” they’re probably going to move on and reach out to the next person they had in their pipeline. Even if they haven’t yet, an employer is unlikely to agree to hire you after you’ve just rejected them. Turning them down and then changing your mind comes off as wishy-washy, and suggests you may not stay loyal to the company for long.

If you’re still unsure after considering these questions, try making a list of all of the different criteria that are important to you in a job search — such as salary, benefits, professional development opportunities, company culture, distance from home, etc. — and assess how well the job offer satisfies those requirements. Then, stack the different categories in order of importance, making sure to note if there are any non-negotiables. Hopefully, this exercise provides you with a more objective, data-driven look at whether or not the position is truly the right fit for you.

Finally, when you’re really feeling lost, it can help to talk things through with somebody you trust: a friend, a parent, a counselor, etc. Sometimes, all you need to clear your head and arrive at the best decision for you is to hear yourself out loud.

Tips for Sharing the News

Once you’ve decided for certain that you’re no longer interested in a job opportunity, it’s time to let the company you’ve been interviewing with know. Here are a few tips you can use to keep it as respectful as possible:

Act Quickly : Often, a company will give you a certain amount of time to consider a job offer. But if you’ve made up your mind before the due date, let them know ASAP — this softens the blow by allowing them to get back to filling the job as quickly as possible.

Consider the Medium : Most people choose to turn down a job offer over email, which in most cases is perfectly fine. But if you really want to go the extra mile, try calling them. While it’s not for everybody, a phone call offers a more personal touch. It can also help you avoid the unfortunate miscommunications that sometimes arise from written messages.

Respond Graciously : The candidate selection process requires a considerable amount of time and resources from companies, so you shouldn’t disrespect their investment by coming off as ungrateful or insensitive. Show that you care by thanking them for their time, and mentioning one or two of the things that you really admired about the company.

Give a Reason : You may be hesitant to explain why you’re turning the job down, but doing so will keep the company from wondering what went wrong, and may even help them improve their hiring process moving forward. Be careful with what exactly you share, though. Something too blunt like “The hiring manager was a jerk” won’t go over well, but saying “I really connected with the team at the other company I was interviewing with” is perfectly acceptable.

Leave It Open-Ended : It might be that you’re still interested in the company, and that it’s just the timing or the specific position that isn’t right. If that’s the case, consider letting them know that you’d love to keep in touch in order to stay up-to-date on future opportunities.

Resource:

https://ca.indeed.com/career-advice/finding-a-job/how-to-decline-a-job-offer
https://www.glassdoor.com/blog/guide/how-to-decline-a-job-offer/
https://www.topinterview.com/interview-advice/how-to-decline-a-job-offer

Brand Strategy Matters: 9 Common Branding Mistakes To Avoid

Top 10 Branding Mistakes and How to Avoid Them

The big moment has come. You’ve taken that next bold step in your company’s evolution and are ready to invest in a brand refresh. You’ve made the executive decision that your old brand is history—it no longer reflects the ethos and values of who you are today, and who you will become tomorrow. It’s time to redefine your brand.

For many, this process is fraught with obstacles that, if not properly navigated, can spell certain disaster, costing your firm valuable time, money and risking loss of internal support. Fortunately, these mistakes can be avoided, and we’re here to help. With 15 years of experience and over 300 clients under our belt, it’s safe to say that we’ve nearly seen it all. We’ve compiled a list of the Top 10 Branding mistakes we’ve seen firms make over the years:

A new logo or website may be a vehicle to convey the new image of the brand, but should not be confused with the most critical aspect of branding: Strategy. Branding lives and dies with strategy: What makes your firm unique? Why should your target audience care? How are you uniquely positioned amongst your peers? What do you stand for? What tone of voice do you carry? How do you solve your customers’ problems? How do you want them to feel when doing so? Not only answering these questions, but supporting them with defendable research is the first critical step to a rebrand. Creative is certainly important, but should exist to support strategy—in order to effectively tell a truly compelling and defendable story.

It’s not about you or the impressive features your product/service offers to the world. It’s your ability to meet the needs of your audience, solve their problems and ease their various pain points. Stop speaking in terms of features, speeds, and feeds. Instead, get comfortable speaking in terms of emotional triggers or benefits. Show a strong commitment to the value you are bringing to your consumers. There will be a variety of features that will no doubt change and shift over time—all should be in support of the way you want your audience to feel.

Branding involves input and support from key influencers across the entire organization. Welcome those perspectives early for broader buy-in and smoother sailing. Recognize that every stakeholder in the organization is a potential ambassador for the brand—within the organization itself as well as externally. That shared sense of ownership will help broaden the reach and ensure faster adoption. Mastering the fine art of knowing who to involve and when to involve them constitutes the difference between a successful deployment and becoming bogged down with too many cooks in the kitchen.

Automation and AI are phenomenal tools for optimizing many aspects of your business, but humanizing a story and telling it with conviction is what gets prospects to engage. At the core of all of us is our innate human desire for a good life, a good world to live it in, and our need to connect within our tribes. Audiences gravitate towards brands that pull them into the story in their world, connect them to the value of the story—and that tell a story that truly resonates. Capture their attention and captivate them with a relatable and authentic story that enriches their lives and they’ll keep coming back for more.

Your customers’ voice is the most important—in telling you what they want and what they need, as well as what they think of you. Brand perception—the good, the bad, and the ugly—is critical to intimately understand as you go about redefining your brand. Personas are great but can change over time, so do your homework. Talk to your target audience. Gather qualitative insights and quantitative data. Invest the time and the resources to fully understand your audience’s pain points and how your product or service can make their lives better. And build in the feedback loop for them to provide you with real-time input on what is working, what is not, and what they need moving forward.

Your brand is a living, breathing aspect of your business that reaches far beyond the deck in which it was presented. All stakeholders need to live, breathe and believe the brand ethos in order for it to take root. As noted in point 3, employees are the living, breathing ambassadors for your brand. What they know, what they believe, and how they behave defines the brand in aggregate. Are the brand promises aligned with the shared values of the organization? Are they believable? If so, you’re well on your way.

Your existing brand may be your baby. You may have founded the company, designed the logo and believe in the mission statement…but do your employees, your investors, your customers? Let go of past biases and let the brand evolve as needed. Origin stories are powerful narratives to embrace, but you need to tell your future-forward story in a way that connects with and empowers your various stakeholders so the transfer of emotional ownership can take place. Only then can a brand thrive—when a brand is owned by many, not by the few. Take a bold step forward and don’t look back.

Not understanding the power of a brand

It’s important to build a brand. Many business owners simply do not understand the proven benefits of a brand, but ignoring the importance of a well-developed brand can cause you to miss out on huge financial gains, recognition, and a competitive edge, among a myriad of other benefits.

A strong brand increases customer loyalty and engagement and creates trust. Consumers are more likely to purchase products from a company with a clear brand story because it’s easier for them to form an emotional connection with that brand. A well-curated brand also improves the perception of quality and recognition by consumers. Customers are much more likely to pay a premium for certain products because they are from a certain brand. This, in turn, allows your company to command a higher price and maintain larger profit margins, increasing overall revenue. Advertising costs can also be affected — consumers who are loyal to your brand are more likely to recommend your brand to others, reducing customer acquisition and advertising costs.

The Gap’s failed crowdsourced logo update. The company reverted to the old logo within six days, after increasing backlash from customers and the design community.

Chobani’s recent facelift is an example of a strategic and effective rebrand.

Not creating strict brand guidelines or enforcing them

Once you build a brand, it is crucial to have proper guidelines in place, as well as a team dedicated to stewarding the brand. Creating a small team, even if only a part-time task force, to answer brand-related questions and to monitor brand usage across the company can prevent costly mistakes and strengthen brand value. Proper brand usage should be communicated throughout your organization. Make your brand guidelines and brand assets, including logo files, colors, and typography readily available, both within your organization and publicly. This can be as simple as having a simple web page dedicated to communicating brand usage and providing easy access to brand assets. Nothing dilutes the power and effectiveness of a brand more than failing to properly maintain it.

It’s also incredibly valuable to have buy-in at all levels of your company, from lower-level employees to C-level executives. Hold a quick rally with employees when launching the brand, sharing the vision behind it and what the future holds for the company. Educate them on proper brand usage, and make it easy for them to access the information and assets they need when interacting with the brand, from brand guidelines to standard templates. Utilize reward systems for proper use among your employees to ensure your brand remains consistent and unmanipulated, allowing your company to build trust with your customers: To build a brand.

Most brand studios and agencies will stay on as consultants after launching the final brand. Use this to your advantage. Have their team conduct regular brand audits to monitor brand usage and call out any glaring holes in your company’s identity.

Uber’s new brand made waves, especially after their last ineffective rebranding attempt. Their website includes a great example of properly executed brand guidelines, including layout, tone of voice, custom type, and photography standards.

Part of Chobani’s new brand guide.

Vitamin Water’s brand book.

Sources:

https://www.linkedin.com/pulse/top-10-branding-mistakes-how-avoid-them-todd-henderson?trk=articles_directory
https://www.holabrief.com/blog/nine-common-branding-mistakes-to-avoid
https://brandfolder.com/blog/biggest-branding-mistakes

How to Write a Tribute Speech No One Will Forget

how to write a tribute

How to Write a Tribute Speech No One Will Forget

Over the course of our lives, we are sometimes challenged to tackle a tribute speech, thanking someone for their contribution or help, or for making our lives better by just being the way they are. So, what is the first thing you need to know about how to write a tribute? A tribute speech is a commemorative speech that demonstrates gratitude, admiration, and respect to a person, group, or institution. The main purpose of a tribute speech is lauding the person you dedicate it to. Normally, a tribute features a warm, celebrated, and heartfelt atmosphere as well as a respectful attitude and high reverence to its subject.

how to write a tribute speech

A tribute speech is given at funerals, reunions, anniversaries, and memorial services. You can deliver it to a friend, colleague, relative, or your loved one, such as mom, dad, brother, and spouse. Most frequently, a tribute is given to a deceased person, but can also be addressed to a living one.

Steps to Write a Tribute Speech

  1. Do some research into the background of the event where you will be giving your speech. Find out who exactly it’s dedicated to and what it’s aimed at.
  2. Get to know your audience. In order to make your tribute appealing and touching, it’s important to understand who will make up the audience and what they are going to expect from your speech. Consider their age, occupation, and relation to the subject of the tribute.
    When googling “How to write a memorial tribute,” you will most likely stumble on some recommendations like getting information about the audience from the person who invited you to give a speech. This is a pretty useful tip. You may ask them to provide some brief info on some your listeners to be ultimately confident about what you are to write.
  3. Now, choose the topic of your speech. Most commonly, it’s already chosen as part of the occasion, but if this is not the case with your tribute, then you are free to give way to your creativity. So, take some time to come up with a relevant topic that will make your tribute sound consistent and wholehearted.
  4. Think of the material you can include in your speech that will enhance the depth of your topic and dress it up a little bit. It may be some great story from the person’s life, pictures, quotations, or some bright memories you share with them.
  5. Now we’ve come closer to the structure of your speech. Begin your tribute with expressing your relation to the subject. Tell the audience how you two met, what kind of a relationship you had (or have), and focus on some highlights of your relationship.
  6. Expand on the personality of the subject. Elaborate on their temper, and some remarkable traits in the context of your relationship. Mention how that person impacted your life and what important lessons they taught you.
  7. Dwell on the subject’s major achievements (so far). Recount their milestones, something that inspired you the most and changed your life for the better. You can also mention some good things they have done (or did, which applies to how to write a tribute speech to a dead person), like charity, taking care of the disabled, etc.
  8. Include the most notable memories you share with that person. Tell the audience about some bright experiences you went through, some precious and memorable moments you had, or anything that made you two involved and close.
  • Be open and sincere. Make no bones about writing from the bottom of your heart and stay candid throughout your speech.
  • Be emotional. Go hard on emotive language, as this signifies your affection to the subject.
  • Be careful not mention negative things about the person. This is especially important to note if you are looking for how to write a funeral tribute. Neither should you focus on some unpleasant experiences you had. Remember that you’re writing a tribute, not a biography that includes everything about the subject.
  • Keep in mind that you shouldn’t exaggerate the subject’s personality or overestimate their input in your life as well as the lives of other people. Moreover, this will make your tribute sound rather glib and fake.
  • Be humorous. Use anecdotes relating to the subject’s life and add some fun to the stories you are to include in the speech. However, try to make your humor balanced, and avoid going too far with the amusement in your tribute.

Help with Writing an Unforgettable Eulogy

If you’re looking for examples of eulogies, read on. But if you’re overwhelmed right now and you could use support in crafting a beautiful eulogy, or if you’d just like someone to help you write a tribute that is as special as your loved one, take a look at SpeechForm. They’ve combined technology with years of speech-crafting expertise to create high quality, affordable eulogy templates that will serve to guide your writing, with tips and prompts on where to personalize. Or if you prefer, you can work directly with their professional speech writing team to craft a bespoke remembrance. One thing we love is that they even help with your delivery, highlighting words and phrases to emphasize while you are speaking. Use code My21Farewelling to save 10% off.

One of the simplest ways to write a eulogy is to review a eulogy speech example that matches your own preferred tone and style. What makes a eulogy unique is the unique details you’ll share about the person themselves, which is why it’s essential to customize your eulogy to honor and celebrate the personality of your loved one.

You may want to start with our primer on how to write a eulogy. Then, use the following outline and eulogy examples to create a strong speech that communicates the message you want to share about the person who meant so much to you.

Eulogy Sample Outline

Using a eulogy sample outline is a proven way to create a great speech. Remember those Mad Libs books from your childhood? This process is similar: follow the outline and plug in the personal details applicable to your loved one.

These eulogy samples help you overcome writer’s block and keep you focused on the details that matter most. Aim to cap the eulogy at a maximum of 10 minutes total. The simplest eulogy outline can be broken down into three parts, so you’ll need to consider how much time to spend on each section:

  • First Section – Introduction: In the opening section, you need to cover a few basic pieces of information before moving onto the main section of the eulogy.
    • Set the tone by beginning with a poem, quote, or scripture that was meaningful to the person.
    • Names they were known by, including nicknames and maiden names.
    • Cause of death (an optional detail).
    • A brief insight into your relationship with the individual.
    • Accomplishments
    • Major life events
    • Stories or fond memories
    • How the person affected others
    • Childhood years
    • Travel adventures
    • Marriage and children
    • Any other thoughts you want to share about the person
    • A final take away from your theme
    • How you want family and friends to remember the individual
    • What the person would want you to remember them for
    • Quote, scripture, or song lyric
    • Thank attendees for participating

    Eulogy Examples for a Friend

    I can’t imagine how empty it will feel to spend time on the basketball court without Jim by my side. Our relationship was built with a basketball in hand, and evolved to share many family gatherings and other activities together over the years. With his passing, Jim is leaving behind a legacy of kindness, compassion, and generosity.

    Jim shared good humor and a big smile with everyone he met. Even though people often cursed at his practical jokes, he was an integral part of creating a solid foundation of friendship in our group. When times were difficult, he could always put a smile on my face. He held his head high until the end, showing what it looks like to finish strong.

    Eulogy Examples for Your Father

    Writing a eulogy for your dad may be really tough. How do you memorialize your hero amid grief and emotion? We hope these tips and the example below will help you in your process.

    My dad was my hero. He could make every person feel like they were the most important person in the world. Growing up, I knew that I could always ask Dad for help – and he would be willing to drop anything to lend a hand. He was a rock of stability in my childhood and a source of strength for our whole family.

    My father was a man who infused fun into the most mundane tasks. I remember how he would turn our bedtime routine into an adventure that included highlights from our favorite storybooks. He was a kind and thoughtful person. Every night at the dinner table, he encouraged us to talk about the things we were grateful for, and always had yummy treats for us kids hidden in the back of the pantry. I will miss you, Dad, and I’ll always hold onto the amazing memories we shared together.

    Eulogy Examples for Your Mother

    How can you ever do justice to a eulogy for your beloved mother – the woman who was always there with love and guidance through the ups and downs, the celebrations and challenging moments of your life? Here are a few tips for writing a eulogy for your mother:

    Heartfelt In Memory Quotes

    You will never stop thinking about them, missing them, and loving them. It will just be a different kind of love. It will be one that can transcend this life and reach them wherever they are in heaven.

    But their loss will leave you with a lighter heart when you know that you have made the best kind of memories with them, and you know that you have made them feel how much you loved them.

    I cannot help but shed a tear or two when I think of you or when I say your name. Even if time has passed and people have moved on, the pain inside my heart remains the same. Although I can laugh and have fun from time to time, still there’s no one else in this world who misses you more than me.

    This can fill your heart with pain and sadness, but regret most of all. You will wish that you had more time, or you will wish that you can turn back time and do it all over again.

    It’s the fact that they will no longer be around in a physical sense that will hurt the most. But knowing that they will be with you again someday, somewhere, should give you some peace and comfort.

    Perfect and Most Thoughtful in Memory Messages

    I am releasing this butterfly to honor your memory and to let you know that you will always be in my heart wherever you may be. Whenever I close my eyes and say a prayer, I know that you will always be near. Although I may be feeling broken inside, please know that I will be alright in time. Fly away, little butterfly, as high as you can fly. Rest in peace because you will be forever loved.

    The day you left broke my heart into a million pieces. Now that you’re gone, my love for you will be safely here inside my heart. I will never forget the bond that we share that will never be broken, even if you’re no longer here. I miss you very much, and I will never stop missing you. I love you more than words can ever say, and more than my heart can ever hold.

    There’s always a new tomorrow no matter how hard or painful today is. There’s always an end to your tears even if your heart is filled with sorrow. There will always be a reason to live even if you feel you can’t go on anymore. There will always be something beautiful to live for even if you have lost someone very precious and true.

    May you always feel the strength of our love for you even if you are no longer here with us. We will never stop loving you and missing you. We will never stop wishing that you were still here with us.

    I will never forget the memories. They will always stay deep in my heart. I will only need to look inside my heart to feel close to you and to make you feel that you will be missed more than you can ever imagine.

    Your memories are a special gift that I will always treasure. The pain will never really be gone from my heart, but I will always love you and remember you every day. Life will never be the same now that you’re gone, but I will honor your memory in the best way possible.

    If memories bring us closer to the people we love who have already departed, you will never be far away from me. We have so much memories that will last me a whole lifetime. You may be gone from this world, but you will never be gone in my heart

    My life is never the same since you’ve been gone. What I wouldn’t give just to have you back in my life. But I know that we’ll be together again someday. This is the promise that I hold on to so that the pain will not hurt as much. You will never be forgotten, my dearest.

    I run this blog to bring light and joy to people across the world. When I am not coming up with new wishes and quotes I enjoy walking my dog with my husband Max and I also sing in our local gospel choir. If you like my website the best compliment you can give me is to share it with your friends and family. Thanks so much for reading, sharing, tweeting and pinning all my work! Susan xx

    Resource:

    https://answershark.com/writing/semi-formal-presentations-and-speeches/how-to-write-tribute-presentation.html
    https://www.myfarewelling.com/article/eulogy-examples
    https://bestwishesandquotes.com/in-memory-quotes/

How to Introduce Yourself in an Email Templates

How to Introduce Yourself in an Email (With Examples!)

Are you looking for a new job? Excited about taking a class? Expanding your clientele? In any of these situations (and a bunch of others!), writing a good introduction email can help the relationship start on a positive note.

Depending on the person you’re “meeting,” you would probably mention different details. For example, if you’re meeting a new team member, you might tell them a bit about your role and how long you’ve been at the company, whereas if you are meeting a potential client, you might focus on the product you represent and how you believe it could benefit them.

Just like an in-person meeting, keep the initial introduction short and to the point. You don’t need to say everything in the first minute—more details can emerge as the conversation progresses.

5 Tips for Writing a Great Introduction Email

Introducing yourself can be stressful, no matter the context. One nice aspect of doing it via email is that you can take the time to re-read and edit as much as needed to make sure it sounds exactly how you envision it.

#1 Make the subject a specific one

The subject of your email should give the email recipient a good idea of what to expect when they read your email. It should also be relatively concise. People read over 40% of emails on mobile devices, and it’ll help the reader if they can see the entire subject line.

Pro tip: If you’re having difficulty writing a compelling subject line, wait until the very end. Write the body of the email first, read through it, and think about what the core idea of your email is.

#2 Set the tone with your email greeting

The first sentence sets the tone of your email correspondence. For an introduction email, it’s best to err on being more formal. This is one way to show respect and create an excellent first impression. If you can, try to add a small positive word. This kicks off the email with some optimism.

#3 Use the BLUF method

Very few people will thoroughly read a 2,000-word introduction email. In the best-case scenario, they might skim over it, but depending on how busy they are, they might not even have the time to do that. Writing a concise email demonstrates your respect for their time.

Do: “Hi Dan, I was wondering if you would be willing to share the research on ABC you cited in the meeting today. I think it will be helpful to me with a project on XYZ that I’m working on.

Why did that help? In the first instance, you’re creating extra work for you and the recipient by necessitating additional communication. There is no way for Dan to know if your question is quick or if you’ll end up calling him for 30 minutes.

Don’t: Hi Anne, Jaimie and I were talking about you earlier today and were wondering if you would consider helping with a bake sale we are planning for next week. The proceeds would go to help refugees.

Do: Hi Anne, Would you like to participate in a bake sale next Saturday from 3-5 pm? All proceeds go towards helping refugee families acclimate to the US. If you’re willing, we could use a few gluten-free desserts.

Why did that help? Notice how in the first instance, Anne wouldn’t know what you’re talking about until the end of the message—the fact that you and Jaimie were talking about her is pretty irrelevant to the end goal of the correspondence.

The second message gives her all the information she will need—the date, time, and type of baked goods you want her to bring. She would be able to respond to that message with a definitive yes or no response.

#4 End with a memorable signoff

#5 Proofread before you send!

Pro tip: Read your email out loud. This can help you notice little errors that might slip by if you’re just reading it in your head. If you’re more tech-savvy, you can download a grammar checker like Grammarly to correct your errors in real-time.

Bonus Pro Tip: If the email doesn’t need to go out immediately, wait an hour or two after writing it to read through it again. Sometimes fresh eyes can help you notice little mistakes that would otherwise slip past.

Templates for Introducing Yourself in an Email

How to introduce yourself in an email for a job

Some companies are too open and free. An example is Shutterstock, which has games rooms and open mic nights for employees. In that case, keep your email tone upbeat and friendly. On the other hand, keep it formal if it’s a serious and professional company.

Once done, go through the text multiple times to correct any errors. Most companies become skeptical of your abilities when they encounter grammar mistakes in your email. Make use of Grammarly extension to do the brushes.

New Employee Self-introduction Email

It’s an introduction email to your new colleagues and will mostly go to your directorate or departments. If you’re hired for a senior-level position, it may go to employees in all branches.

Once you’ve sent the email, you’re likely to get new employees coming to say hi. It’s a bonus point to fill your desks with treats for anyone. It’s a simple but powerful gesture showing how much a team player you are.

Self-introduction Email To Team

The type of introductory email is somehow similar to the one above. The only difference is that it narrows down from the whole organization to the team you’ll be working with directly or reporting to you.

This means that you’ll need to give them more information. The length of the email depends on what you want to communicate. However, you don’t want to put down all your new plans, structure, strategies in a single email.

Self-introduction Email To Client

My name is Martin. A and the new Content Marketing Manager at (company). I’ve recently joined the company and will be taking over as the new contact point for the content marketing project moving forward.

Professional self-introduction email sample

My name is Martin. A and I’m the new Content Marketing Manager at (company). I’d love to introduce myself to you and see how we can establish a robust relationship between our two businesses.

Self-introduction email – samples

Thank you for signing up with our company. At R Corp, we pride ourselves on our impeccable customer service, work ethic, and quality. We have many different products and services for you to try. You can check them out here:

My name is Sarah Smith, and I am writing to introduce myself as the ABC company’s new marketing manager. Having taken over the position recently, I am excited to meet everyone and discuss how we can work together towards continued success in the future. Should you have any questions, I’d be happy to answer them. Please, don’t hesitate to get in touch.

My name is Emilia John, and I am a huge admirer of the work that West Technologies is doing. I am reaching as I saw your email address listed as the contact person for an open Technical Project Manager position online. I have attached my resume to this email, and I hope you will consider me for this role.

My name is Kelly, frontend engineer for XYZ technologies. I found your email address as the contact person for the open Frontend engineering position online. I am reaching out to learn more about the position. Please let me know how can I apply for the position. Thanks and regards,

I recently read about your success as a data analyst. My name is Ryan Richards. I am a graduate student reaching out to you because I hope to interview you to learn about your job and its relation to market research. I am happy to meet at a time and place that is convenient for you.

I am a friend of Lucas Miller, who has told me a lot about your successful marketing campaigns and I was really impressed with it. As I have just started out my career in marketing, I would love to learn more about your approach.

I hope this email finds you well. I wish to introduce my new colleague Amy Blake. She has recently joined us and will be taking over product management. I have CC’d Amy in this email, so please feel free to connect.

I wish to extend a wholehearted welcome to you on behalf of ABC company. We have exciting things going on, and we are delighted to have you as part of our family. Feel free to contact if you have any questions.

Writing an introductory email might seem challenging, but once you master how to introduce yourself in an email, it opens a lot of doors with exciting opportunities for you. Putting time and effort into writing a self-introductory email is bound to get you a favorable reply. You can use an introduction email example to create the best introductory email for yourself get access to several new opportunities.

Source:

https://www.scienceofpeople.com/how-to-introduce-yourself-in-an-email/
https://www.rightinbox.com/blog/introduce-yourself-in-an-email
https://www.interviewkickstart.com/career-advice/how-to-introduce-yourself-in-an-email